Prosecco a-go-go

I’ve recently become aware of the Tesco Wine Community – a group of like-minded individuals musing, comparing wines tasted and talking about new wine experiences. Loving a good chat about wine I immediately signed up. Forums on wine are nothing new, but this is one with a difference, and that comes directly from the ‘Wine Enthusiasts’ within Tesco. Every week they run a tasting panel – they choose a particular wine, open a new topic thread, and anyone interested in trying that particular wine can register to get a bottle – Free wine! Well, not quite – In exchange you agree to write up a tasting note on the wine and paste on to the forum and the Tesco website. Seeing the passion that other members have displayed when reviewing previous bottles makes you up your game, and many clearly spend a good deal of time and effort. It still sounds like a good deal… and it is.

The more lively a member you become, you move up ranking levels (Bronze, Silver and Gold). The higher the bracket you are, you may even be lucky enough to be chosen as forum ‘Member of the Month’, and you get a whole case of wine to taste and review! I haven’t quite earned that privilege yet, but I did manage to get on a tasting panel for Motivo Prosecco D.O.C Brut from Italian producer Borgo Molino.   From my regular blogging you will see that I have a love of all things sparkling, be that the classic Champagne, through to my recently tasted Slovenian sparklers, so this tasting seemed like a bottle right up my street. The good news is that there is absolute freedom as to how you conduct your tasting, with no set formats (I personally conducted mine in both ISO approved tasting glasses and standard flute). All levels are welcome on the forum so you don’t need any tutored expertise in tasting, just enthusiasm.

From a background perspective, Prosecco is a sparkling wine from northern Italy, and I would suggest, along with Spanish Cava (and maybe English Sparklers) the major competition to Champagne. There are probably three majors factors that will drive a purchase of Prosecco over Champagne (aside of patriotic duty), and these are quality, price and sweetness. Production of sparkling wines the world over run the gamut from wine spending years in bottle undergoing second fermentation and lees ageing, through to wines that undergo carbonation (think fizzy drinks). Thankfully we’re in the former territory here.

DSC_0557

The bottle in question is worthy of note and care has obviously gone in to the design and production. It’s fairly reminiscent to me of Ruinart Champagne, with its squat bottle, gold foil and beige logo, and the embossing on the front of the glass is a nice extra touch. When comparing this bottle of Prosecco to others in my local Tesco, it was a stand-out.  Some still have a light blue foil on the bottle – this to me says sweet wine (think Babycham), and it’s good that this one has erred to more ‘earthy’ colours, which make me think terroir, ergo rustic and well crafted. Of course, these extra touches all count towards the total cost of the bottle.

The next thing to notice is the extremely pale straw yellow of the wine, suggesting subtlety – again very similar to that of a Blanc de Blancs. The wine clocks in at 11% abv as you would expect from a Prosecco, and there’s no visible tears on the glass. A good barometer of the quality within the production methods of sparkling are the size of the bubbles – false carbonation gives a larger bubble. Thankfully, here we have a tiny bubble which in turn gives a subtle spritz of flavour rather than a gaseous overture.

On the nose I get a fresh and zesty lemon citric note, alongside pipped fruit – yellow melon, and green notes – at first this was pear, but it moved along to fleshy green apple. The initial palate is an explosion of froth – light and refreshing – and virtually evaporating in the mouth. Once this dissipates, the first hit is of clean youthful lemon and green fruit. This quickly gives way to a secondary note of something bordering on creamy tropical, stopping short of pineapple, more akin to passion fruit.

The vibrant acidity continues the refreshing notes of fleshy green apple. For such a light bodied wine, it is a compliment that it has such length of palate. Once the initial fruit gives way, I get hints of smoke and a calculated bitterness – something to give some sort of depth to the linear cleanse, and further indicating care in the winery. With the alcohol at a light 11% there are some noticeable touches of sweetness on the palate, but nothing cloying, and I could happily drink this as a refreshing aperitif. I tasted the wine on its own, but paired with food this would be an easy match with starters or hors d’oeuvre.

I really hope that Tesco continue this initiative in showing their commitment to their range, listening to their customers, and fostering a vibrant community. What with their recent well publicised financial troubles, this could be something that easily falls by the way-side as an unnecessary expense, but I really hope it doesn’t.

With thanks to Tesco and Borgo Molino for the bottle used in this tasting.

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100 years of Simon Bros.

Part 3 of my Dom Pérignon History Series

We give the credit to Moét as the first Champagne house to introduce a Prestige Cuvée, but if the question is looked at in terms of the production of a top of the range exclusive blend for a specialised market, the accolade would have to go to Louis Roederer. The firm were producing their prestige cuvée Cristal way back in 1876, a full 59 years ahead of Moet, but it wasn’t a commercial venture. The Russian preference towards Champagne erred towards a sweeter wine, different to that of France and the rest of Europe, and this difference in style meant that any commercial sights that the company could have would be impossible to fulfil. The wine therefore remained exclusively for the consumption of Tsar Alexander II and his court, in a clear bottling – allegedly to ensure that the drink was not tainted or impaired in any way. Following the Russian revolution of 1917, the demand disappeared, and any remaining bottles were eventually sold off to South America.

Demand for Champagne in the early 1930s was muted. The after effects of the great depression reached the French economy in 1931 and, when the understandable plan of cutting retail prices to help shift bottles was put in to place, heavy financial losses were incurred by the producers. This in turn meant that some had to sell off key vineyards, and some simply went bust.

The market needed stimulation, and in 1932 English Journalist Laurence Venn suggested (in his capacity as marketing consultant to the Syndicat de Grandes Marques de Champagne) that, instead of focusing on discounting at the lower end, they needed to aim for the top end of the market. Needless to say the idea was unanimously rejected by the Syndicat, who offered that if they couldn’t move cheap bottles, how would they be able to sell more expensive ones? Venn reasoned that the aristocracy were the only people who continued to have money during the financial difficulties for such extravagances as Champagne, and a top quality wine costing twice the price of standard Champagne would be of appeal.

Following this rejection, Venn was approached by Comte Robert-Jean de Vogüé – a descendent of the Moéts and in charge of commercial affairs for the company. 1935 marked the 100th anniversary of Moét’s London based agent, Simon Bros. and Co, and Robert-Jean was looking for a way to thank their top clients for sticking with them during the hardships. In tandem, the exercise would also be a good way of Moét thanking their agent too. Many of the failing Champagne producers had naturally blamed their distribution network for failing to find suitable markets for their wine in the depression, and fired them outright.

In the anniversary year the idea came to fruition, and 150 of Simon Brothers’ most illustrious clients would find themselves receiving a hamper with 2 specially commissioned bottlings of Moét. In order to differentiate it from the normal bottlings and to add prestige, each bottle was a hand blown replica akin to one their ancestors would have seen back in the late eighteenth century. Corks were secured in the old style using string, and sealed from dust and dirt using green sealing wax. The label was adorned with vine shoot motifs (known as ‘ppmpres’) by the engraver Deletain. No brand was mentioned on the bottle – the label inscription simply read “Champagne especially shipped for Simon Bros. and Co.’s Centenary 1835-1935″, but there is no doubt that the wine in the familiar shaped bottle with the iconic shield label was clearly the forerunner to Dom Pérignon.

The vintage used was the 1926, a small but fine yield that had 9 years of maturity by this bottling.  The yields for that year were small for a variety of reasons including slow flowering (which brought about coulure), as well as chlorosis, insect damage, and rot.  Aside of intermittent hailstorms, September bought fine rainless weather than aided the ripening, and grapes were picked quickly, albeit slightly later than usual.  As the 1926 hadn’t been released as usual in the early 1930’s due to the financial crisis, not all shippers had declared the vintage. This meant that the year was held in esteem and attracting a good price. Word of this unique bottling quickly spread from the wealthy recipients to their friends across the Atlantic in America, who were revelling in a post-prohibition frenzy. Moét & Chandon soon found themselves inundated with requests as to when the wine would be available to them.

1936 saw the first commercial bottling and, in order to maintain the maturity levels shown in the previous bottling, the next successful vintage available was chosen. As the years following 1926 had either seen poor harvests or ones that weren’t ready at this time, they had to delve further back in to their wine stores, choosing the 1921 vintage. At 15 years old already this must have been a sublime bottling, equivalent to what Moét release today as their Dom Pérignon P2 (aka Plenitude 2 – wines that have reached their second plateau of maturity). The year had begun with heavy frosts in the winter and spring which destroyed much of the crop, but this was followed by a gloriously hot summer, and when harvest commenced on September 19th, the grapes that remained produced an excellent wine. At the helm for this blend was celebrated winemaker Ernest Goubault, then in his final year with the company, and it was he who created what was destined to become the most expensive Champagne available on the market at that time (around $90 per case of 12 bottles). As the label couldn’t bear the Simon Brothers inscription from the previous year a new branding was needed. To further increase the prestige, Comte Robert-Jean de Vogúé decided to name it after the forefather of Champagne – Dom Pérignon. Interestingly the brand name was previously owned by Champagne house Mercier but went unused. It was gifted to Moét as part of the dowry on the marriage between Francine Durand-Mercier and Comte Paul Chandon-Moét in 1927.

DP21

New York received 100 cases (1,200 bottles) of the Dom Pérignon 1921 in the November of 1936 just in time for Christmas and New Year celebrations, shipped across courtesy of the French luxury liner ‘The Normandie’. Needless to say, it was a huge success, to such an extent that France didn’t even get an allocation – it all went to quench the thirst of the important American market. 16 bottles which had belonged to Doris Duke (daughter of James Buchanan Duke, and heiress to the billionaire fortune of the American Tobacco Company) were famously sold at a Christie’s auction in New York City in June 2004. Showing her importance as a wine buyer in the 1930’s, Duke was able to be allocated 100 bottles from this limited first shipment just for herself, and in the years following her death her cellars and its pristine contents of many memorable producers and vintages were sold off for well over the pre-sale estimates.

In order to keep the quality level of Dom Pérignon at its peak, there would be another few years of maturity required to ensure the next successful available vintages – the 1928 and 1929 – could be enjoyed. In the end, due to the running seam in the Champagne story of success mixed with hard times, it would be post-war palates that would have the pleasure of drinking them.

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I before E

I’m referring of course to ‘I before e, except after c’, the rhyme used to assist people with their spelling. Whilst a handy little mnemonic, it is largely ignored now as having too many exceptions to the rule to make it a useful learning tool (I’ve used one exception myself in my very first sentence). These ground rules are important though for establishing boundaries, and I came across one when progressing through my WSET Levels 2 and 3 (Intermediate and Advanced) that I thought I would share. In todays wine world it’s not a watertight rule by any means, and there are multiple exceptions, but for me it still plays a large visual part of how I structure the wine world, and certainly something I still use when helping others.

I’m talking about the 30-50 rule – that wine is produced in countries, and specifically limited to the areas of those countries, that lie between 30-50 degrees latitude in both the northern hemisphere and the southern hemisphere.

Wine Map   Map Source ThirtyFifty

When I’ve run tastings for small groups it’s been a particularly successful visual in helping people to work out where in the world they are drinking, as well as the what. I had maps printed on pages of A4 and laminated, and then set them out as placemats for each taster. They could use the blank side of the page to assess the appearance/colour of their wine, and then flip the page over to put it in context as to where it has come from. Is it cool climate or warm climate? Is the region near water or inland?

As you can see from the image above the majority of wine producing areas fall within these two bands, certainly all of the important historical ones. Two things are changing this though and may eventually consign the 30-50 rule to the bin.

Firstly is global warming, which is now allowing viticulture to take place in the outer limits of these boundaries. Only 50 years ago English wine was a dream away, and certainly not something that could ever be taken seriously. How times have changed, and just the rise of a degree or two has enabled winemaking to move north in to southern England (and also parts of northern Germany). There isn’t enough warmth yet to successfully ripen red grapes to any depth – some varietal wines exist but they are far outnumbered by their white counterparts, and the red grapes are better utilised in sparkling wine. Many of these red grapes won’t be familiar, being either hybrid or Germanic varieties, but the most famous red is Pinot Noir which, liking a longer cooler climate takes well here. It also thrives in northern France, being a key component in Champagne and the red grape of Burgundy.

Secondly, progressive winemaking is continually changing the production methods and vintners have an armoury of tools to use in a given circumstance. If you head back to the decades leading up to the 1980’s it wasn’t unusual to see a split of harvests something like 3 vintages per decade being rated as poor, 3 years rated as good, 2 as great and 2 as outstanding. These days you are unlikely ever to see wines rated below good. Technology allows such constant intervention in every step of the winemaking process that you can disperse storm clouds using iodine flares or utilise temperature controls in warmer climates. The younger breed of tenacious winemakers, producing in many countries (Chile, for example) where winemaking has no tradition handed down through generations, have no rules to bind or limit them. They’re continually taking winemaking further or higher, looking for that unique new mix of climate, soil and grape variety that will create a unique selling point (USP).

As things progress, I hope that the map visual with its two bands will continue to be used, even with its inaccuracies. For me, it limited what I viewed at the beginning of my wine studies as the unlimited number of wines that existed in the world. Sainsbury’s sold different wine to Tesco, who sold different wine to Marks & Spencer. Multiply that by the number of merchants, regions, producers and individual lines/brands, and you had something that was frankly un-fathomable.

Conversely, it was a map of the whole world that allowed me to put things in to perspective.

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There’s no bad wine……?

Talking to a Master of Wine (MW) a while back, I mentioned that recently I had tasted a wine that I could only describe as horrible. His retort still sticks with me – “There are no bad wines, just wines that you wouldn’t buy”. It’s actually quite a sound statement – a wine may not to be to my liking, but there will be merit in there somewhere, be it identifying that the producer has cut corners using oak chips, or they’ve picked the grapes too early.  Good critique should be along these lines as opposed to a simple like/dislike.

With this in mind, I have been mulling over an article that was published last month in various media outlets (Google 75% Wine Based Drinks for a selection), exposing what essentially amounted to rogue wines being sold in supermarkets alongside normal wine. Cue a certain amount of shock/horror along with cries that someone somewhere (be it the supermarkets, the producers) were trying to get one over on us. The exposé originated from online supermarket sommelier wotwine? who are a team of wine experts (including several MWs) who taste through wines sold in supermarkets to give advice on what to buy. This is a good website, given the sheer volume of wine available in our combined supermarkets.

During their regular tastings some wines were noted as ‘lacking genuine character and dilute’. On closer inspection they noticed that some were actually subtlety described on the back label as being ‘wine based drinks’ (WBDs) – in other words, only 75% of the drink was actually wine, topped up with either grape juice or, more likely, water. And yet here they were, in similar shaped bottles, adorned by labels that made them look every inch like a wine, on the same shelves as all the other bottles. I definitely agree that it was a good call by wotwine? to bring these bottles up for debate, but find myself disagreeing, or certainly thinking that they were being unfair to these WBDs, and I’ll explain why.

Within a supermarket environment, strangely my whole attitude to wine changes. I watch food & wine matching sections on programmes like Saturday Kitchen and think “yes, this afternoon I’m going to rummage around my local store and pick up 6 really cool bottles” but when I get there, without fail I always slip in to supermarket mode. I become less the wine lover picking out select bottles and immediately flip to someone looking for bargains – weekday wines, being drawn (albeit consciously) to the little red labels that denote discounts or offers, looking at the bin-ends and maybe being a little daunted (or time conscious) by the aisles of wine available. Something about that supermarket environment just seems to focus my mentality to how I buy food or household goods, or how-much-other-stuff-could-I-buy-for-the-same-price logic, rather than the luxury, spontaneity, and indulgence in a merchant. I go there to buy supermarket wine, and my expectations are set accordingly.

The focus of concern in the article centred on two issues  – firstly, that the wine shouldn’t be on the shelves with normal wine as it was a pale imitation, and secondly, that it generally tasted foul. Indeed wotwine? were quoted as saying they wouldn’t pay a penny for it. Regarding its placing on the shelf, I offer a similar example – supermarket own Cola. These cheaper products sit on the shelves alongside market leaders Pepsi and Coke, but there is no call to segregate these less intense products, even though the taste of own brand cola is streets away from them. It’s not that the own brands are not real cola or that they are bad (many people are happy with them).  There’s just some cola you wouldn’t regularly buy.

Invariably it comes down to either brand and/or price, and that’s no different to these WBDs. Most supermarkets split wine sections in to red/white, and then in to country of origin. That’s it. When shopping (for example) in the Australian reds section, if you want something lighter in alcohol (unusual for Oz as the sun fully ripens the grapes), and are looking in the budget range of £4.50 per bottle (as these WBDs are), what’s the point in having them split away somewhere else? The customer makes the choice as to what they want.

To move on to the quality of the wine itself, there was no other way for me to decide other than to seek out a bottle for myself. I opted for the Australian ‘Copper’ red wine, 12.5% abv from Sainsbury’s. The pricing is a worry – £4.50 per bottle is entry level, but this was priced at £6.25 a bottle – only available for £4.50 when buying 2 for £9. At £6.25 we’re well in to my tried-and-trusted everyday wine drinking price bracket, and you can get more for your money.

In colour it looked no different to any other youthful red. On the nose it was sweet confectionate black cherry and sweet spices, some vanilla and, more worryingly, something that smelt like furniture polish. The palate hits straight away with upfront cherry, but dissipates fairly immediately, leaving a hollow middle. Any length is solely sustained by cloying sugars. In its favour it does have good acidity. My review generally concurs with wotwine? who list it as ‘sweet’ and ‘thin’, but it is still a wine (12.5% abv) albeit a little suspect at the recommended price point

I don’t agree though that the supermarkets are to blame for tricking customers in to buying it, or that it’s undrinkable. In the end the proof will of course be in the sales figures, but it was not a wine I would recommend to others, or buy again.

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Painting a picture

By way of introduction to my upcoming series of articles on the history of Dom Pérignon, I thought I would offer up some general notes on the Champagne region from the start of the 20th century, leading up to the first release. Hopefully this will act as a primer for the general mood of France at that time.

Champagne remains a by-word for special occasions, celebrations and good times, but travelling back in time 100 years shows the region ravaged by war, vine disease and poor harvests. Today, all of the big Champagne houses produce a Prestige Cuvée, a showcase for their top wines blended to perfection, and made in limited quantities. Back in the 1930’s it was unheard of. Dom Pérignon was the first and is arguably still the King of them all. In such a time of austerity, why were Moét & Chandon even thinking about launching such an extravagant product?

The harvest of 1899 had been excellent and spirits were high. The next two harvests produced pleasingly large yields, but the resulting grapes lacked the acidity needed for ageing and thus produced wines suitable only for short term consumption. Subsequently, the prices paid to growers began to tumble, all the way down to the level paid for grapes destined to make simple ‘Vin Ordinaire’. Fluctuating quality across each of the Champagne houses meant that the good wines had to be sought out amongst the bad, and consumers began to rely on their personal stocks.

With the notable exception of 1904 which produced a bumper crop of slow maturing wine, and a ‘good’ vintage in 1906, the next few years all produced failures at vintage time. This came to a head with the 1910 vintage, which was severely blighted by insects, mould and mildew. The net result of this was that, instead of producing the usual 30 million bottles of Champagne, they only produced circa 1 million. Producers needed a good vintage to stay in business, and they certainly got that in 1911, but the good fortune would come at a cost.

The Champenois are notorious to this day for protecting their brand, and it was around this time that the first formal land classifications were being drawn up as to what vines could be included as part of Champagne. Without any Grand or Premier Cru sites to its name, the southern area of Aube was excluded as being of a second standard. Soon after, the Government passed a bill to this effect and the understandably angered Aube vignerons went in to revolt around the rest of the region, destroying whatever came in to their sights. Needless to say, a worried government hastily annulled the original bill, but not before several people lost their lives, and land and vines had been burned. The Aube were finally officially admitted in to the region in 1927, but their primary function to this day is rounding out Champagne blends, existing as something of a minority partner.

No sooner was this internal conflict coming to a conclusion, the shadow of war arrived, bringing four years of massive destruction. France’s involvement in the First World War in 1914 came towards the end of a blisteringly hot summer, and the Germans had reached the vineyards before the first grapes had been picked. The vineyards initially survived the early part of the war intact; such was the belief by the invaders that they would soon be the owners of the land. Following two average years, the harvest of 1914 was desperately needed, but again came at a price.

Continuing business as usual meant that just being in the vineyards was dangerous work, and many women and children lost their lives there whilst the men were fighting and dying at the front. At the conclusion of the war, Champagne had lost half of its residents, literally wiping out a generation, and forty percent of its vineyards were ruined or poisoned from shelling. Now in desperate need of physically rebuilding itself, Champagne was also financially ruined with the treasuries having been looted.  In addition, many thousands of bottles of champagne had been destroyed – either being given to French soldiers to boost morale, or drunk by the invading army.

Understandably, the vintages between 1914 and 1918 had all fared as either modest or poor, and produced less than average yields. Nearly three quarters of the best vineyards no longer existed, and what vines hadn’t been destroyed outright were dying a slow death, through either lack of labour, or materials such as fertiliser. Whilst the vineyards were ripped up and replaced, the difficulty of exporting any Champagne out of France meant that there was no shortage fulfilling the thirst of post war euphoria, and both the 1919 and 1920 vintages were immediately consumed. The build up of stocks further continued due to the loss of sales to a post-revolutionary Russia, and would soon be further affected by an America dry under Prohibition (1919-1933), and then in financial straits following the Wall Street Crash of 1929.

The 1920s only managed a handful of excellent vintages – The 1921, 1928 and 1929. All three of these years would eventually be made in to the first commercial releases of Dom Pérignon.

 

Recommended Further Reading:

‘The Great Wine Blight’ by George Ordish

‘Champagne – How the World’s Most Glamorous Wine Triumphed Over War and Hard Times’ by Don & Petie Kladstrup

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It’s all Greek for me

Last weekend saw Decanter magazine put on their usual March Fine Wine Encounter, but for the first time the event was completely devoted over to wines from the Mediterranean. Looking specifically at these wines threw up quite a few firsts for me and is a well-timed move by Decanter. Merchants and even some supermarkets are already starting to stock or broaden their ranges from countries such as Israel, Lebanon and Turkey, and this in turn means that customers are able to start trying these wines without specifically hunting them out. A quick look at the awards being dished out further paints the picture – In the 2009 Decanter World Wine Awards (picked purely as it was the nearest historic Awards catalogue to me as I write) Turkey won only one bronze medal – In the 2014 awards they won over 40 medals. Obviously producers need to be entering their wines in the competition in the first place, and the number of those entered certainly has gone up, but you get the picture.

Wine enthusiasts are always looking for the next thing – I think it’s an inherent part of being interested in wine (it certainly is for me). With prices pushing certain wines out of reach on the one hand and the glut of commercially successful variety wines on the other, the time seems right to delve in to what’s been going on in these hitherto unembraced countries. Hand in hand with this is the education piece – I mentioned the tasting to a worldly-wise family member and their reply was that they didn’t even know wine was made in some of these countries.

There’s also good news for the casual wine drinker and that is, as well as becoming more widely available, the wines are pretty darn good too. It’s easy to forget that these countries having been honing their craft for years, and constitute the oldest places on earth to have been making wine (Old-Old World Wine, if you like). Like anywhere, I’m sure there are still many works-in-progress to be found, but for those shown at the Decanter event I’d be happy to pay the same price as I pay for my regular bottles. I’d certainly get a renewed vigour in sharing them with others to spread the word.

My top takeaways from the day, in no particular order:

  • Moschofilero – a Greek white grape – makes a deliciously peachy and floral Sparkling.  I tasted the Amalia Brut NV from Ktima Tselepos.  I’ll be looking more at this variety.
  • Slovenia are making Sparkling wines (the Slovenian term is Penina), so you may soon be drinking Penina alongside your Cava’s and your Prosecco’s.  The wines tasted on the day were in large part Chardonnay, blended with smaller amounts of Rebula (AKA Ribolla Gialla from Friuli).
  • Rapsani is a small high altitude Greek village making smooth jammy reds.  Having tasted the offerings on the day, I now have the badge to prove I am a #rapsanilover.  Greece showed really well on the day for me, definitely proving that (and I’m sure that they’d agree with me here) some of the uninspiring wines that they were quite famous for, are now a thing of the past.
  • And finally, honourable mention for the lovely chap pouring at the Villa Conchi stand, who admitted to me that they were new to the show circuit and launching a new range of Cava’s.  This was the first stand I went to on the day as I like to start with Sparkling, and I don’t think he had his pour levels quite sorted out.  They were as big as you’d get when buying a glass of wine in a restaurant!  Too good to spit though and a lovely creamy Brut Imperial NV.

Overall, producers seem to have found a good balance of producing wines from indigenous grapes to create their own regional USPs (unique selling points) and the more internationally recognised varieties, so as not to scare off traditionalists. It remains to be seen whether drinkers will take to obscure grape varieties such as Krassato or Kalecik Karasi as they have to Sauvignon Blanc and Pinot Grigio. I was thoroughly happy with the day though – a lot of new avenues to discover and over 20 new grape varieties tasted. Having been to many Decanter events in the past it did feel a little quieter than previous ones focusing on more established regions so, with my above enthusiasm noted, there is definitely more inroads to go to get the masses excited about these wines.

The good news is that they are now clearly on the agenda. For me, I was actually happy this time around with less attendees (the flagship November event can be quite rowdy with thirsty tasters three deep at particular producers!) as it gave more chance to have lengthy chats with the winemakers (whose first language is not necessarily English), and to taste through their whole offerings rather than just picking highlights.

Yamas!

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