Wines of Greece (and my 200th variety tasted!)

Whilst on a recent trip to the Greek island of Zakynthos I made sure to stay in touch with the local wines which, after olive oil, is one of their major agricultural endeavours.

Although the shelves still have plenty of room given over to sweeter wines, the dry wines they produce are now a far cry from the oft-maligned ones that Greece was once famous for.

Winemaking in Zakynthos is focused on the central part of the island sweeping north to south through the fertile central plains.  There are five major wineries on the island, with Solomos and Callinico being the two most featured in Kalamiaki where I was staying.

Red grapes fare better in the soils and warm/hot climate here and so production is focused on red wines (or strong rosé wines).  Even though it isn’t viewed as the faux pas it once was, it did feel odd drinking red with the fresh local fish dishes in my quest to drink local too.

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Tsantali ‘Metóxi’ Limnio/Cabernet Sauvignon blend 2011, Mount Athos, Greece, 13%, ~£10

The Tsantali family have been producing wine since 1890, and this blend spends 8 months in large French oak barrels prior to seeing further ageing in bottle.

A nice deep dark ruby in colour, this wine had a full nose of cherry and herbaceous spice.  The palate comprised black berried fruit with much of the crunch of a typical Cabernet Sauvignon and toasty roasty woodiness.  In addition there were further spicy notes, a medium acidity and a smooth lengthy finish.

I’m not sure what the blending percentages are, but even though Limnio is listed first it’s either stylistically very similar to Cabernet or it forms the lesser part of the blend.  Regardless, Limnio is one to add to my list of new grape varieties tried (my 199th one to be precise) and Oz Clarke described it as “one of Greece’s most important red vines” so it’s a good one to tick off.

Augustos Avgoustiatis, Zakynthos, Greece, 12.5%. ~£4.00

This wine is made from the local Zakynthian Avgoustiatis grape variety which is so-named as it ripens early and is usually picked at the end of August.  This is another variety which I had never tried before and marks my 200th so I will be sending off the next ‘Wine Century’ form very shortly!

A vibrant youthful purple in colour, the dense nose was led by black cherry and also offered some confectionate sweetness.

The palate was a veritable compendium of sensations and I noted down coffee, chocolate, meat, blood, smoke and wood, all finished off with a lighter touch of vanilla!  It’s fair to say that this was a rustic earthy wine that was more about the tertiary darker characters than it was the vibrant fruit suggested by its appearance.  What fruits did appear were reminiscent of plums and damsons.

Also of note was a medium gripping tannin against a good fresh acid which probably made the whole blend come together, working well against the dark notes of the wine.

Googling this grape variety now shows that the resultant wines should be about clean fruit and of high quality, so I’d wager the cheap price tag on this one has fairly influenced this particular bottling and it wasn’t a typical example.  I didn’t even note down a specific vintage year which could also be indicative that one wasn’t offered up by the label.

Note: I did also try this variety again in a Solomos ‘Amoudi’ 2013 (blend with Mavrodaphne) wine so, although I didn’t write a tasting note for that wine, I’m still comfortable to tick it off the list.

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Estate Papaioannou Agiorgitiko 2006, Nemea, Greece, 13%, ~£12.00

I’ll also briefly mention this wine which, coming from the Agiorgitiko grape, I was convinced would take me to 201 varieties tried.  Alas, upon checking my notes I already seem to have tried it.

I’ll still give it a brief mention though as it was lovely and reminiscent of a good Pinot Noir balancing a lightness of touch with a good depth.  It even managed to win a Gold medal at the Thessaloniki International Wine Challenge back in 2009.

Hailing from Nemea VQPRD AOC and coming from a 40 hectare plot of vines, the wine was a light red in colour and full of redcurrants and cherry on the palate.  Clear wood, light vanilla, pepper spice and a hint of chocolate blended with a fresh acid rounding out a well realised wine.

Even though I couldn’t add this grape variety to my list, the quality of this bottle will remind me for some time to come that I’ve definitely tasted it.  Lovely stuff.

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