Kelman Wines @ Friarwood

Many times I’ve lamented that my current tastings calendar doesn’t really fully explore the wines of either Portugal or Germany. So when my friends at London fine wine merchant Friarwood partnered up with Portuguese artisan winery Kelman, I jumped at the chance to give their wines a try.

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Hailing from the Dão in the northern part of the country, and one of the oldest demarcated wine-regions in the world, the year 2000 saw Kelman planting 6 hectares of traditional Portuguese grape varieties to fully explore the country’s winemaking roots. They produced their first wines in 2013.

Surrounded by mountains, their vineyards benefit from diurnal temperature fluctuations, key for producing elegant wines with long ageing potential. Fruit is manually hand-harvested and entirely foot-trodden in traditional granite lagares dating back to 1741. In the winery they practice non-interventionalist winemaking methods.

Commenting on the partnership, Auriane d’Aramon, head wine buyer for Friarwood said: “We were looking for a small independent Portuguese winery, producing classic yet unique, quality wines. We were absolutely thrilled when we discovered Kelman producing some carefully crafted, limited small batch wines from Dão. Made with unique grape varietals that are classic to the region, their entire range is very consistent and elegant”.

When the wines arrived I was immediately taken with them. There’s a handful of things on a bottle that say ‘buy me and try me’, and the Kelman range ticks several boxes.

1. A well-designed label – the front label is actually split in to 3 sections which, when aligned next to the back label, form the scripted K of Kelman. It’s not printed, it’s the glass showing through the labels. Very clever.

2. Indigenous grape varieties – I’m always keen to try something new and interesting, in this case, the Alfrocheiro grape.

3. Numbered bottles – All wine is of course, limited edition, but there’s something special about knowing you are trying X% or bottle number X of the overall production volume.

Everything’s looking good – on to the tasting.

Kelman Encruzado

Kelman Family Vineyard, Encruzado (100%), Dáo DOC, Portugal, 2017, 13.5%, £17

This was presented in a Burgundy shaped bottle; number 2,490 of the 3,750 produced.

Lemon gold in colour, this wine needed a little coaxing on the nose to get the best out of it. The tasting note (which I read after conducting the tasting) said chill well, but I actually got more out of both the nose and palate when it had warmed through a little. I was then able to get the light tropics of pineapple and yellow melon, along with a dash of lime and a touch of honey. An underlying richness was peppered with warm cakey spices.

The medium bodied palate was both vibrant and inviting; soft, yet strong, with an oily and rich textured creaminess from 5 months batonnage. Peach and satsuma and a hint of grapefruit added to the citrus and melon, the low acidity gave way to a clear saline after-taste, which carried for several minutes and defined the palate.

This saltiness, whilst not to my palate preference for on-its-own drinking, suggested a food match, and it paired wonderfully with some Gorgonzola, with really brought out the depth and well-crafted layers.

Kelman Tinto Reserva

Kelman Family Vineyard, Tinto Reserva (blend), Dáo DOC, Portugal, 2016, 14%, £19.90

Presented in a broader, heavier Burgundian style bottle, this was numbered 331 out of the 4,230 bottles produced, and comprised a blend of 60% Touriga Nacional, 25% Tinta Roriz, and 15% Alfrocheiro. The Touriga Nacional was aged 12 months in new French oak.

A vibrant deep ruby in colour, this had an immediately accessible floral rich nose of vanilla, violets and silk. The fruit was equally intense, full of black cherry and touches of prune, a touch of milk chocolate, and winter cake spices. For a wine that is only 2 years old, this was full of complex character yet managed to retain a feeling of light effortlessness.

The palate gave up a broth-like, stew-intense complexity; incredibly rich and body warming. I noted figs and cinnamon, bitter chocolate, coffee beans, light plum and redcurrant to finish. Medium weight but fully packed, this carried a light grainy tannin, a nice fresh medium acidity and held a long finish characterised by the coffee/tertiary notes.

To me it had all the class of an aged Claret but with the body and building power of a new-world young-gun. Simply superb and well worth seeking out.

You can buy the Kelman range exclusively through the Friarwood website.

With thanks to Friarwood for supplying the bottles used in this tasting.

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