Dom Pérignon 1998 – “A Bottle Named Desire”

KL98 v1

A natural facet of creating and maintaining an air of mystery for a prestige Champagne is the need to keep external exposure and detail to a minimum.  In line with this policy, bespoke advertising for Dom Pérignon as a standalone brand was non-existent for a long time.

The last drive to push Dom sales had been in the late 1950’s where, in a post 2nd World War world, there was an inherent need to build the new brand as a standalone entity.

Late 50s Ad

With sales now booming and the print adverts of the 1960’s and 70’s focusing more on brand alignment as opposed to individual product, Dom was relegated to forming part of the wider Moét stable as opposed to a top tier offering.

Moet DP 69 Advert

The Neville Brody brand re-working of 2004 chose to re-instigate a direct advertising approach, such was the requirement in a world used to surfing visuals via the internet and where positioning against other ‘advert-friendly’ prestige brands was critical.  As such, Dom was thrust back in to the pages of appropriate publications and well and truly back in the limelight.

DP98 Helena Bath

The campaign for the 1998 vintage was given over to German fashion designer Karl Lagerfeld, well known for his collaborations with the Italian and French design houses of Fendi and Chanel. As his leading lady Lagerfeld chose Danish ‘Supermodel’ Helena Christensen to star alongside several male models and bottles of Dom Perignon.  Shot in an 18th century Parisian townhouse (a nod back to the origins of Moét & Chandon) Lagerfeld stated that he was after a ‘Barry Lyndon’ effect, name-checking the gloriously shot period film by director Stanley Kubrick, to deliver the right atmosphere for Dom Perignon.

What transpired on the page was intimate, slightly erotic, but always classy and elegant, and the shoot produced so many iconic images that a book was released in November 2005 titled ‘The 7 Fantasmes of a Women’.

Made up of Christensen and the other models in various black and white images, and with very little wording to tell the whole story, no real explanation was given as to why the Dom Perignon was there at all.

7 Fantasmes of Women DP98

The pairing of Lagerfeld and Christensen was a happy one with both having known each other for just under 20 years and some of Helena’s first work being for Lagerfeld.  Indeed, she cited it as the main reason for taking the role, alongside being able to drink Dom Pérignon for two days straight.  The resulting images were hardly out of wine publications of the time and laid the groundwork for the celebrity endorsements the brand still uses to this day.

Perhaps Lagerfelds crowning glory for Dom Pérignon was his tie-in creation “A Bottle Named Desire”.  Unveiled in February 2006, this was a limited run of 1,998 bottles of the 1998 Vintage.  With gold foil unique to this release, each bottle was dressed with 50 ‘golden’ studs attached.  Housed in an elegant semi-opaque jewel case, each set was individually numbered below the golden shield clasp, and ‘signed’ by Karl.

DP98 KL Edition Montage

The result was a visually stunning set with Lagerfeld intending the golden studs to emulate the vibrant bubbles within, capturing the very soul of the bottle and making it an object of desire.  The set was exclusively available in the top London boutique stores including Harrods, who got a large allocation and proudly gave it one of their world-famous window displays.

Like the limited ‘Irodori’ 1996 before it, despite the eye-watering £1,000 price tag, the set sold out soon after release.  It was then, and still remains, the most expensive first-release price for a Dom Pérignon vintage special edition.

Although the general Dom packaging went through several changes for both the 1999 and 2000 Vintages as the Neville Brody amendments bedded in, no further Prestige editions for these vintages were produced.  It wouldn’t be long though before the Andy Warhol inspired editions of the 2002 Vintage came along and, in a further first for the brand, they began changing the infamous shield logo for the first time.

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Dom Pérignon 1996 ‘Irodori’ Edition & Brand Changes

Following on from the various special millennial releases of the 1992 and 1993 vintages, the release of the 1996 Dom Pérignon was the first to employ the talents of an established designer to create a unique and prestige offering.

Japanese artist Eriko Horiki, well known for her delicate creations in the traditional Japanese paper known as ‘washi’, was commissioned to produce the exclusive offering.  Under the artistic direction of photographer Keiichi Tahara, Eriko surrounded each bottle in thousands of sheets of coloured paper creating a glorious paper rainbow effect.

Irodori Main

Having been given the artistic brief of conveying the essence of the 1996 vintage and highlighting its inner radiance she undertook the delicate task of breaking down aspects of light in to a sublime range of colours, step by step, sheet by sheet. By evoking light in dazzling rays and in all of its variation she brought the paper medium to life, giving it body and luminosity.

Acting as a contrast between concentration and movement, the piece was titled “Irodori”, a literal translation of the Japanese for an ‘assortment of colours’.  Housed inside a clear casing the bottle greeted the market mounted inside a virtual aura of light.

With further launches held in Barcelona, New York and Sydney, the Irodori set was unveiled in London in September 2004.  Priced at £350, the limited edition run of 1,996 sets was an immediate sell out and remains an extremely rare and historic piece of Dom history.

DP 1996 Sp Ed

At the same time the brand, and specifically its packaging and presence in the marketplace, was under review.  Whilst variants of the familiar green packaging had been in place since the release of the 1990 vintage (which also saw Rosé releases finally switched in to a bespoke dark pink coffret) the release of the 1998 was something of a watershed moment.

The earlier half of 2004 had seen the brand partner up with the English graphic design company Neville Brody.  With a view to taking the brand strategy and market positioning up a gear, the mandate was to seek out elegance, glamour and appeal whilst retaining the core luxury cues such as the shield label and bottle shape.

Founded in 1994 and now with offices in London, Paris and Berlin, Neville Brody were famous for their mould breaking re-designs of UK newspapers such as The Guardian and The Times, and their work with companies such as Old Navy, Chloe, and YSL.

A year-long review saw them move the packaging away from both the standard green colouring and chest style coffret in the most radical way possible.  Their vision, beginning with the 1998 vintage release, was to upgrade the packaging to a dark black colour (and shocking pink for Rosé) with silver trim.

Including consultancy to produce a consistent style of brand language for both product inserts and material such as window displays, their radically different way to differentiate on the shelf contained unique dyes and paper that took over a year to develop.   The 1999 vintage would see the old design literally turned on its head with a monolithic upright model with push button opening.

Owner/designer Neville Brody commented that the brand “market is ageing so we have used some subtle leveraging to move it into a modern space”.  He added that “It has taken a year to get the finish of the packaging exactly right, with the right silver, weight and touch. Dom Pérignon is such a pared-down brand with very little story or myth that it is all about the exact detail. If you get the detail wrong then the whole thing doesn’t work”.

Designers Lionel Massias and Marion Lauren oversaw the bulk of the work at the design company’s Paris office, with art direction overseen by Neville Brody himself.  The first outputs were seen in both the black coffret replacement of the standard green packaging, along with a revised box with a silver flare, inspired by current collaborator Karl Lagerfeld.

Dom P 1998 3 variations

With the above variants the 1998 vintage was already one of the most diversely offered vintages and a gateway to the current yearly designer collaboration editions, but just around the corner there was a huge upgrade to the vintage and the brand.

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‘Dom Pérignon 1998 – The Collection’. The world’s most expensive cookbook

Over the years Dom Pérignon have found ways for the consumer to experience the prestige of their brand, even if they’ve never opened a bottle of their Champagne.  As well as the more standard accessories such as glassware and Champagne buckets, official merchandise has ranged from Bento boxes (used to serve Sushi as an ideal accompaniment to a bottle), cigar cases, and even a chess board.

One of the most curious items to appear though must be the cookery book that was released to tie in with the June 2005 release of the 1998 Vintage. ‘Dom Pérignon Vintage 1998 – The Collection’ (published by Ptarmigan) came in at a whopping 292 pages and was likely never intended to be something that you would keep in the kitchen to idly flick through for inspiration on a weekday night.

Indeed, in the written introduction by Dom Pérignon Chef de Cave Richard Geoffroy, he describes the tome as “not in fact a book but a great work of art”.  He goes on to add that “whilst containing no more than bound sheets of high quality paper…recipes and images have been woven into a rich counterpoint, like…(those) which great opera and symphonies depend”

Stirring stuff but, as of the time of writing, this release remains the only time the brand has attempted to produce such a companion piece.

The volume pulled together 35 of the best chefs working in the UK at the time, each working for a famous restaurant such as Le Gavroche or Les Manoir aux Quat’Saisons.  Many well-known names were included such as Michael Caines, Angela Hartnett, Michel Roux Jr, and Tom Aikens.

The record temperatures of the 1998 vintage had provided grapes that were succulent and full of flavour and each chef had been invited to provide a recipe that they believed would pair exquisitely with the final blend.  In addition, some chefs even included the wine as part of the ingredients.

Alongside a clutch of starters and desserts, the core of the book featured many fish-led main courses, and included:

  • Andalouse of sole – Jean-Christophe Novelli
  • Tartare of sea bass with dill – Michel Roux Jr
  • Caramelised lobster and Wagyu beef – Tom Thomsen
  • Salmon ‘mi-cuit’, spiced lentil, foie gras ballotine – John Campbell (who, incidentally, was then the head chef at my nearby eatery The Vineyard at Stockcross)

dom-p-cookbook

Art was also very much a key part of the book, and it contained exclusively commissioned pieces from three major artists:

  • Charles Saatchi favourite Sophie von Hellermann provided a series of vignettes of the ‘glitterati’ including Joanne Harris, Philip Green, Sir Roger Moore, Theo Fennel, Lord Lloyd Webber, Meredith Etherington-Smith, Karl Lagerfeld and Helena Christensen. These sat alongside short interview pieces for each of the subjects, captured by journalist Lucia van der Post
  • French illustrator Stephane Gamain provided stylised illustrations of each featured chef to sit alongside their biographies
  • Japanese photographer Yukata Yahamoto produced still life images for each recipe, based on the key ingredients

dom-p-cookbook3

Also included was a nod to fashion designer Karl Lagerfeld, who at the time was collaborating with the brand on the artistic vision of their 1998 Vintage release (featuring Helena Christensen).

In keeping with the prestige tradition of Dom Pérignon, two different versions of the book were available to purchase.  Retailing for £1000 and listed as the most expensive cookbook ever produced, the premium edition was a limited run of just 30 copies and came bound in sea-green galuchat leather, harvested from the hide of a rare Japanese ray.

dom-p-cookbook2

Each of the 30 sleeves were individually hand polished giving them a distinct and unique appearance and, in addition to this exclusive sleeve, the commissioned prints were signed by the artists involved.  In a generous move by the brand, the highly positioned retail price wasn’t to be swallowed up simply as vast profit; all proceeds from the sales were donated to a selection of UK charities.

For those that couldn’t stretch to the deluxe version, the same (unsigned) hardback edition was produced in a wider print run of 1500 editions housed in a dust jacket containing a printed image of the galuchet leather effect.  The retail price for this version came in at a more modest £40.

‘Dom Pérignon Vintage 1998 – The Collection’ was released in November 2005.

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