Aldi Wine Club 13th Tasting Panel – Notes #5 and #6

Well, here we are already on to the final two wines of the 13th Aldi Wine Club panel, and once again it has been a great opportunity to try some wines not on my ordinary supermarket list.

As per the first two bottles received there was a last minute swap out by Aldi and, due to the nicer weather we’ve been seeing here in the UK recently, instead of the planned Chateau Peyredoulle Bordeaux I received:

Aldi Prosecco v3

Aldi Prosecco Superiore NV, Valdobbiadene DOCG, Italy, 11%, £7.99

Prosecco is a tried and trusted crowd-pleaser when the weather is warmer, such is the light fresh and fruity nature of the style, and I’ve no doubt that this particular example will be a favourite for many.

A lovely vibrant medium yellow in colour, the nose was full of clean apple and citrus notes.

The palate was immediately light and quaffable with the soft bubble explosion literally melting in your mouth.  A well balanced and refreshing acid streaked down either side of my tongue giving a good spritz whilst allowing the fruit to stay in the centre of your palate.

Juxtaposing this lightness was the fruit character that the bottle described as autumnal, and they weren’t wrong.  Rather than the crunchy green ‘Granny Smith’ apple you usually find in these lighter styles, there was a definite broody yellow apple tone reminiscent of ‘Golden Delicious’.  Notably darker in character than ‘Granny Smith’, we had soft and sweet yellow flesh, both creamy and slightly bruised, with almost a touch of clove and cinnamon.

A touch of lemon citrus lifted the syrupy apple end palate which, at times, became almost cider-like.  The shift between light and dark certainly made this an interesting wine to try, and the sweet apple kept the finish going in the mouth for some time.

Aldi Andara Merlot v2

Andara Merlot 2015, Chile, 13%, £3.99

This particular Merlot was due in the first batch of wines a couple of months back but, in a similar way to the Prosecco above, was shifted out and joins us here in the final two.  Merlot is, of course, one of the French varieties that has made its home in Chile and thrives in popularity.

A medium youthful purple in colour with visible alcohol ‘tears’ in the glass, the nose was particularly full and interesting, with perceptible layers and density.  Included were liquorice notes, black pepper, dark black berry and cherry, and wood with a whiff of vanilla.  The overall sensation was slightly herbaceous with a cakey-bready thick complexion.

On the palate there were jammy blackberry fruits and a fairly high acidity, matched up against smoky dusky blue-skinned plummy fruit.  There were also secondary tones of bitter dark chocolate and a touch of mint on the aftertaste.  Whilst this should represent a veritable compote of flavour, all in all the palate felt a bit disparate with a raw unfinished quality, and not entirely well blended together.

Such was the imbalance of this wine, unusually for an Aldi Wine Club submission, I was able to discern the price prior to looking for it.  At £3.99, whilst there is a good argument that such imperfection should perhaps be expected, I would counter-argue that wines such as Toro Loco show that quality at this level is actively attainable.

With thanks to Aldi UK for the bottles used in this tasting.

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UK 2016 Vintage Report #5 – August

A quick catch up now on how my vines are doing in the summer month of August.

There has been continued good weather throughout the month with just enough rain here and there to keep the vines watered.  The temperatures have peaked on a handful of days at 26-28 degrees Celsius (usually during the week when I have to be at work!), but are maintaining a good run in the early twenties.

UK Ortega Aug16

There are two main points of interest since the last update.  The first relates to the vigour of the vines which have basically (and would have done if they could’ve) gone through the roof.  Due to a recent leg injury I wasn’t able to tend them as closely as I should have for several weeks and so it has been increasingly obvious.

When I was able to get back out I needed to seriously prune something like 50% off of the height, and I have even done one further pruning session since then to keep them tidy.  All varieties are seeing this growth, even my Ortega, which last year was noticeably less vigorous than the Chardonnay and the MVN3.

This growth (especially when I was unable to tend them) has had one bad consequence.  When twinned with the high winds that we have seen on several days, my trellising has become loosened and has pulled my vines forward by 2-3 inches. At only 3 years in the ground they are still fairly fragile and, fearing they could snap at the bases, I quickly corrected this.

When winter comes I shall have to look in to installing a new trellising system, more robust than before, that can take the weight of the vigour I am now used to seeing.

UK MVN3 Aug16

The second point of interest is the grape growth, which is coming along nicely, albeit still showing elements of uneven bunch growth (millerandage) on my MVN3.  This is odd as this variety was planted a full year before the Chardonnay and Ortega vines and I would therefore have thought would be more established.

uk-chard-aug16

The Ortega and Chardonnay are coming along nicely with the later maturing Chardonnay progressing just behind the Ortega, but both have good volumes of healthy bunches.  In terms of disease, the mites still seem to be attacking the extremities of the Ortega, but this was cleaned off during pruning so shouldn’t be a problem.

As August comes to an end we approach the final bank holiday weekend of the year.  Traditionally these are wet and miserable affairs in the UK, but the forecasts currently show decent weather akin to that which we have seen recently.  This is hopefully a good sign that we will have a settled and warm September, maturing the grapes in their final 8 weeks on the vine.

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Barefoot Refresh – Crisp Red review

Off to California for this weeks’ tasting note, to try part of the ‘Refresh’ range from Barefoot. This is a new range in the UK and consists of a Crisp Red, a Crisp White, and a Perfectly Pink Rosé wine, each blended specifically to be served over ice. Hmmm, Red wine over Ice??

Barefoot

The seeds of Barefoot were sown within the California wine explosion of the 1960’s but the real story starts in the mid 1980’s when founders Michael and Bonnie Harvey set up Barefoot cellars and created the footprint logo that still adorns their labels today. Since 2005 they have been part of the wine behemoth Gallo.

The ‘Refresh’ range has been available in the USA for a year or two now (they have already added two extra wines – a Summer Red and a Sweet White), but as summer approaches the UK and thoughts turn to refreshing al fresco drinking, the appearance of this wine is well timed to tap in to what is a growing market. Spearheaded some time ago by the trend of cider with ice, the momentum is building, and you may recall that in April I reported on the new Champagne-over-ice blend that Moét have just launched here.

Maybe on one or two occasions I’ve popped an ice cube in a glass of White or Rosé if the bottle has not been cold enough, but I’ve never had the inclination to do that with a red wine, and for that reason I’ve decided to review the Crisp Red from the range, which is a blend of Pinots Noir, Rosé and Grigio.

The clear bottle (unusual for a red wine) shows a vibrant clear dark cherry red wine, and the screw cap opens with a subtle pfffft. The spritz in this wine comes from carbonation (the bottle clearly states this is an ‘aerated semi-sparkling wine’ from the addition of carbon dioxide) as opposed to anything approaching the methods used to create the bubbles found in Champagne etc.

The nose was clear red fruit – a summery fresh blend of strawberry, raspberry, red currants and Cranberry. The palate carries on the veritable fruit salad mix – but what impressed me the most was the body of the wine. I was expecting it to be a fairly light bodied, perhaps that of a Rosé but, retaining the character of a red wine, the body was medium.

I didn’t actually try the wine without ice to see how it tasted, but I assume it was sweet like concentrate. Without wishing to over-complicate the bottle, the specific blend was created by chilling the wine, which kills the yeast and stops the fermentation early (at approximately 10% abv). Sugar remains unconverted to alcohol, and it is this sweetness that allows the wine to retain its medium body without becoming washed out and tasteless through the dilution of melting ice cubes.

To sum up, this bottle was every bit as refreshing and moreish on a warm day as Sangria or Pimms, and the fruity length was pleasing, a touch sweet, but not cloying.

The only worry for me here is that this style of wine, and its lower alcohol level meant it was very easy to drink it – in many ways it didn’t feel like I was drinking wine at all, but some sort of wine alternative. Before I knew it I was halfway through the bottle! Oops.

Thanks to Barefoot/Gallo and Tesco for providing the bottle used in this tasting.

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